How is your business perceived by job candidates?

12 Ways To Market Your Company To Potential Employees

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12 Ways To Market Your Company To Potential Employees

No matter the state of the economy, one thing is forever true.  You should never stop actively marketing your company as a future home for job candidates.  Because people are an integral part of any organization.  And here’s how to do it . . .

 

A few weeks ago I wrote a series on how to improve your hiring process.  I wrote it as a marketer and as a career strategist, the role I play over at Tim’s Strategy.  But really I wrote it as a former job seeker who’s watched companies (first hand) completely screw up the hiring and job interview process.

 

They leave job seekers out in the cold, forget to prepare their interview teams and allow the wrong people to meet potential new employees.  And they forget that everyone who is exposed to their brand in this way will tell others.  On Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and in the networking rooms around town.

 

So if you run a company, a marketing department or an HR function, please pay attention to these ideas.  Because every touch point matters today.  Public opinion is no longer formed on the store shelves and it is no longer permanent as tides shift with the power of social mentions.

 

But really you should think about this as an opportunity.  To actively invite potential employees to your offices, Facebook pages or Twitter accounts.

 

Invite them to you.  And then wow them.

 

So as part one of a two-part series, here are some ideas to market your company to job candidates.  By treating them like customers.  And making them feel valued before, during and after the interview process:

 

1.  Have a quarterly open house – coordinate with job clubs, recruiting partners, city governments to invite interested people to learn about your company,  Show off your products, your personality, your management team and invite them to follow you on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

 

2.  Create an inviting “careers page” on your website – Don’t just list open jobs.  Do that, yes, but also offer resources for candidates to research your company (a press kit for candidates), create a “how to interview with us” FAQ (frequently asked questions), introduce key management with a link to their LinkedIn page.  Make it easy for people to learn about you.

 

3.  Encourage employees to network – Create a team of volunteer evangelists who speak or network at industry group events and local job clubs.  You can leave a great first impression or perhaps change a bad one with the presence and involvement of just one person.

 

4.  Communicate “interview day” news – Smart companies will send out an internal newsletter or update letting current employees know that interviews are occurring that day.  With a brief summary of who’s coming and why.  This is especially effective with smaller companies where the odds of running into a candidate are pretty high.  The message?  These are important people, be nice to them and offer to help them.

 

5.  Assign a Sherpa – Job candidates aren’t sure where to go, don’t know the layout of your offices and aren’t always comfortable asking for water or the restroom.  So assign someone in the department or HR to make sure candidates are treated like a customer.  And that someone knows where they are at all times.

 

6.  Consider business casual dress for interviews – Companies want to see candidates in fancy suits and ties, pantyhose and high heels.  Even though the everyday dress at the company is business casual or casual.  For all the candidates who have arrived in an expensive suit only to met by a company employee dressed in shorts, this one’s for you.

 

To read the remaining six ways, click here. You can also subscribe to Fix, Build and Drive™ by Email today. That way you won’t miss anything important.

 

Be sure to become a fan on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.  Thanks!

 

What ways can you suggest?  Does your company use any innovative methods? Let us know in the comments.

 

Thanks Rameshng for the photo via Flickr.

Tim Tyrell-Smith focuses on marketing, brand development and business strategy for emerging and established organizations. A veteran executive in consumer marketing, Tim started his marketing career with Nestle USA and has since worked in product management on premium brands including Nestle Quik, Tree Top Apple Juice, Mauna Loa Macadamias and Meguiar’s Car Wax. He was most recently Vice President of Marketing for a private equity owned food company in Southern California. He lives with his wife and three kids in Mission Viejo, California.

Tim Tyrell-Smith – who has written posts on Fix, Build And Drive™.


About the Author

Tim Tyrell-Smith focuses on marketing, brand development and business strategy for emerging and established organizations. A veteran executive in consumer marketing, Tim started his marketing career with Nestle USA and has since worked in product management on premium brands including Nestle Quik, Tree Top Apple Juice, Mauna Loa Macadamias and Meguiar’s Car Wax. He was most recently Vice President of Marketing for a private equity owned food company in Southern California. He lives with his wife and three kids in Mission Viejo, California.

Comments (7):

  1. Great article. We are currently in the process of hiring new talent, and it is vital to show an appearance of professionalism and organization.

  2. Hey Joe – Yes, it matters. And is simply good practice for when anyone comes in to the office. Customers, vendors, etc. Thanks for your comment.

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