Are You Ready To Hire New People?

5 Steps To Improve The Hiring Process

3
5 Steps To Improve The Hiring Process

The hiring process is broken at many companies.  And since people make your company great (or not great), the hiring process and its result can make or break your year as well as the delivery of the long-term plan.

 

This is part one of a two-part series on improving your hiring process. 

 

As part of a Fix, Build and Drive strategy for building momentum in your business, improving the hiring process removes a big impediment to success.  Once you “fix” the problems that deliver the wrong people to your organization, you can begin to “build” the right team that can “drive” your business forward.

 

So it’s kind of important.  And you may just need some friendly guidance to help you improve your process.

 

Whether you are a big company or a small one just beginning the process of bringing on staff, each position requires significant time and attention.  It is an expensive and disruptive game to hire and fire because you could not get it right the first time.  Both parties suffer when the process is broken.

 

These ideas were shared as part of a presentation I gave to the National Human Resources Association in Orange County, CA.  I hope it helps you think through and improve your hiring process.

 

Here are fives fixes to improve your interview and hiring process as well as some specific suggestions for each to get you thinking:

 

1. Be Transparent

 

  • Create clear job descriptions - Some job descriptions are pulled off monster.com and, with just a few word changes, are recycled for use at a company.  Others are written from scratch but do not contain the data needed by the HR or interview teams to establish clear interview criteria.  A clearly written job description includes tangible and measurable criteria.  So that at least a portion of the candidate’s fit can be determined successfully.

 

  • Publish interview schedules - Problems in interviews happen when people don’t know where they are supposed to be and when they are supposed to be there.  These need to be communicated well in advance.  And not just to the interview team but also to the candidates so they can be prepared as well.

 

  • Offer HR and interview bios - Job candidates deserve to know who they will be meeting with and some sense of what that person’s role might be in the interview process.  Some companies like to keep this a secret, but there is value for both parties to be aware.  Better preparation on both sides will result in a better exchange of ideas during each conversation.

 

  • Provide company information - Some companies believe that seeing what research candidates do on their own is a rite of passage or a place to prove just how interested the candidate is in a company.  But why not share information with candidates in advance? It tells them what you need them to know and provides a base of information for a candidate to build upon as well as to a source to create some questions of their own.

 

  • Offer advance access - What if you offered an internal resource?  A person, no matter the level, who could answer basic questions (not just re: logistics).  Candidates will come in more comfortable and more able to present their value on interview day.

 

All of this transparency will result in good PR for your company.  Because, whether you hire someone or not, you still want to be leaving candidates with a positive view of your organization.  Job candidates talk to each other, and may become a customer.

 

2. Develop A Social Strategy

 

  • Announce jobs on Facebook page - Does your company have a Facebook page?  If so, you can announce new openings to people who already like you and may know someone who can refer the perfect candidate.  You may even be able to get to know candidates a bit just based on how they engage with your team.

 

  • Network with job candidates on Twitter - As a company, be on the lookout for potential candidates.  You can search for them on Twitter, but also be open to engaging with people on Twitter.  You may find your next head of marketing via Twitter.  Someone who already wants to work for you and can convince you to offer an interview based on their social media savvy.

 

  • Accept personal invites on LinkedIn - You can use LinkedIn to establish new connections for candidates you’ll hire today or get to know and hire next year.  But be open as an organization to meet new people even if there isn’t an immediate opening.  Good people deserve a listen and your company may have an inside track on their services down the road if you were willing to connect with them today.  But don’t just accept generic LinkedIn invites – make them work a little bit for the connection.

 

  • Go to networking events - As a full-time CEO, GM or department manager, it is sometimes hard to justify any additional time away from home for networking.  But the truth is that social networking is smart for your own career and a smart way to find and get to know new talent for your organization.  By attending a mix of events in your industry and some outside your industry but within your hiring geography, you’ll get to meet potential new candidates.  You can learn in 5 minutes whether someone is worth inviting back to the office.

 

  • Have a sense of humility - Some hiring managers don’t have a lot of compassion for job seekers.  They’ve never been in that situation and don’t understand how that (being out of work) happens to people.  So they are a bit pompous and, unfortunately, look down on the job candidates as lesser people.  Big mistake.

 

For steps 3-5, you can now read part 2 of this post.  You can also Subscribe to Fix, Build and Drive™ by email today. That way you won’t miss anything important.

 

If you’d like help with your hiring process or for more information on each of the points above, contact us today.

 

Thanks alancleaver_2000 for the photo via Flickr

 

Tim Tyrell-Smith focuses on marketing, brand development and business strategy for emerging and established organizations. A veteran executive in consumer marketing, Tim started his marketing career with Nestle USA and has since worked in product management on premium brands including Nestle Quik, Tree Top Apple Juice, Mauna Loa Macadamias and Meguiar’s Car Wax. He was most recently Vice President of Marketing for a private equity owned food company in Southern California. He lives with his wife and three kids in Mission Viejo, California.

Tim Tyrell-Smith – who has written posts on Fix, Build And Drive™.


About the Author

Tim Tyrell-Smith focuses on marketing, brand development and business strategy for emerging and established organizations. A veteran executive in consumer marketing, Tim started his marketing career with Nestle USA and has since worked in product management on premium brands including Nestle Quik, Tree Top Apple Juice, Mauna Loa Macadamias and Meguiar’s Car Wax. He was most recently Vice President of Marketing for a private equity owned food company in Southern California. He lives with his wife and three kids in Mission Viejo, California.

Comments (3):

  1. [...] on improving the hiring process.  If you are hiring or plan to be hiring in the coming months, read part one which includes steps 1 and 2 to get [...]

  2. [...] while I did not give up networking, speaking and blogging completely (see my series on improving the hiring process over at Fix, Build And Drive™), my lower level of engagement reduced my productivity. I was [...]

  3. [...] few weeks ago I wrote a series on how to improve your hiring process.  I wrote it as a marketer and as a career strategist, the role I play over at Tim’s [...]

Leave a Reply