To separate you from the crowd . . .

What’s Your Brand Promise?

29
What’s Your Brand Promise?

New to the blog? Subscribe to Fix, Build and Drive™ by Email today. That way you won’t miss anything important.

 

If you are a small business, nonprofit or a person trying to communicate something important, there needs to be a promise in there somewhere

 

It translates into a reason why someone would bother to engage with you.  To listen on.  And begin using your product or service.  To pay attention to you.

 

Brand promises are often very obvious.  They show up in taglines, headlines and in actions taken by the company.  Especially those that are reinforced over time.

 

Without a strong brand promise, you place a business obstacle in your path.  As you try to grow awareness or sales.

 

A few examples from the world I come from (consumer goods):

 

Snickers: Snickers Satisfies

So the promise for Snickers is about delivering more than chocolate.  It promises a cure for hunger.  And a great eating experience.  Not what you normally expect with a candy bar.

 

Avis: We Try Harder

Being #2 has it’s challenges.  At the time Avis identified this promise, they were struggling to compete with Hertz.  So they began to promise with a message about customer service.  About working harder to get and keep your business.

 

Snapple: Made from the Best Stuff On Earth

Snapple has a great, quirky brand that went from obscure to major mainstream.  What’s this say about their brand?  It’s made from natural ingredients.  And high quality ones.  And the use of the word “stuff” only reinforces their very approachable brand.

 

Apple: Think Different

What can you expect from Apple?  Different ideas.  Outward thinking.  Anything that is not Microsoft.  Appeals to those looking to escape the status quo. Now, of course, they are known for tremendous, discontinuous innovation.

 

BMW: The Ultimate Driving Machine

If you step into a seat on the driver’s side of a BMW, this says you will get an experience.  This promise appeals to those looking for more from their transportation.  It’s not about getting around town.  It’s about a passion for driving (speed, performance, technology, comfort).

 

So what’s your brand promise?

 

What are you telling people on your website, in your marketing materials or on your business cards?  Go look right now.  Read it all and comment below when you find it.  Couldn’t find one?  Not one you liked?

 

Then ask yourself and others whether anyone really cares?  If your promise doesn’t solve a problem, offer a need service or powerful communicate your cause, then it’s not that valuable.

 

Can you deliver against it?

 

Sure, you can promise the world.  You can say you’ve got a great return policy like Nordstrom.  But do you have the stomach to deliver against it?  You can promise the best customer service in your industry. But are you committed to the hiring and training of great new people?

 

Who are you looking to attract?

 

Who is your target customer?  Have one?  Using the BMW example, are you targeting 35-55 year old men with a high household income? If so, how does your brand promise sound to them?

 

Interested to learn more?  Get in touch re: my speaking and marketing coaching services.

 

I can help.  :-)

 

Thanks to ditatompel for the great photo via Flickr

Tim Tyrell-Smith focuses on marketing, brand development and business strategy for emerging and established organizations. A veteran executive in consumer marketing, Tim started his marketing career with Nestle USA and has since worked in product management on premium brands including Nestle Quik, Tree Top Apple Juice, Mauna Loa Macadamias and Meguiar’s Car Wax. He was most recently Vice President of Marketing for a private equity owned food company in Southern California. He lives with his wife and three kids in Mission Viejo, California.

Tim Tyrell-Smith – who has written posts on Fix, Build And Drive™.


About the Author

Tim Tyrell-Smith focuses on marketing, brand development and business strategy for emerging and established organizations. A veteran executive in consumer marketing, Tim started his marketing career with Nestle USA and has since worked in product management on premium brands including Nestle Quik, Tree Top Apple Juice, Mauna Loa Macadamias and Meguiar’s Car Wax. He was most recently Vice President of Marketing for a private equity owned food company in Southern California. He lives with his wife and three kids in Mission Viejo, California.

Comments (29):

  1. [...] a unique personal brand and manage its evolution. What’s your brand promise? What shows your difference from others seeking similar work in your community? As your life moves [...]

  2. [...] a unique personal brand and manage its evolution. What’s your brand promise? What shows your difference from others seeking similar work in your community? As your life moves [...]

  3. [...] this month, I wrote a post called “what’s your brand promise?”.  And I’ve had some great conversations with people on the subject over the last [...]

  4. [...] I asked “What’s Your Brand Promise?” and answered another common question: “Brand Promise: Do I Really Need [...]

  5. [...] Have a strong brand promise or “reason why” people should consider your product or service.  And then deliver on [...]

  6. [...] profile a carbon copy of your resume. Your summary can be a powerful place to introduce your brand promise to recruiters, hiring managers and HR folks.  If you write it [...]

  7. [...] wanting to learn more.  Instead of their being left with wandering ears and eyes.   So develop a strong brand promise so that I know what makes you great.  And how I can differentiate you from the others out looking [...]

  8. [...] they do it or a staff person does.  But for those who stick with it, the opportunity is huge.  To establish your brand online.  To meet potential customers.  And to learn from the world’s best about how to [...]

  9. [...] Create a brand promise – Create a brand promise as a way to differentiate your business or brand from everyone else in your industry who does what [...]

  10. [...] profile a carbon copy of your resume. Your summary can be a powerful place to introduce your brand promise to recruiters, hiring managers and HR folks.  If you write it [...]

  11. [...] One that I am writing over a number of weeks about your brand promise.  If you are asking “What’s a brand promise?“, you can read up on that before [...]

  12. [...] The strength and consistent delivery of your brand promise.  Your brand promise comes across in your “About page”, online bios, site messaging, [...]

  13. [...] What’s your brand promise? [...]

  14. [...] profile a carbon copy of your resume. Your summary can be a powerful place to introduce your brand promise to recruiters, hiring managers and HR folks.  If you write it [...]

  15. [...] about your value?  Why should someone invest money or time in you or your products?  Having a clear and benefit-based brand promise clarifies things for you and your [...]

  16. I think that delivering the promise of your brand is even more important than having one. Therefore, everybody should be really careful about what their brand promises.

  17. [...] can be a powerful tool to establish your brand promise.  But it can also be an inefficient activity if you are not doing it [...]

  18. [...] create a personality that fits you, your approach to the category or market, and your brand promise. Your business will get stronger as a result of you thinking more clearly about your core audience [...]

  19. [...] interested.  Create a custom landing page just for people who found you there.  And use your company brand promise as the lead content in your bio. Show how relevant you are to target companies and you will get [...]

  20. [...] course they do! But the right brands really matter. And if the brand has a consistent and relevant brand promise, there can be a great long-term relationship (and positive results) for everyone [...]

  21. [...] profile a carbon copy of your resume. Your summary can be a powerful place to introduce your brand promise to recruiters, hiring managers and HR folks.  If you write it [...]

  22. [...] describe the value I create for prospective employers (or as markers like to say make a “brand promise“) in six [...]

  23. [...] way to tell his story (visually and verbally). And once we had the strategy confirmed (including a new brand promise), we brought in a creative talent to help develop the logo and website [...]

  24. [...] I asked “What’s Your Brand Promise?” and answered another common question: “Brand Promise: Do I Really Need [...]

  25. [...] course, you have to write these well, the content needs to match your brand promise and/or brand personality. If it’s not true to the brand or simply trying to be cute, well [...]

  26. [...] are looking for a story, a brand promise that resonates with them and compels them to call one over the eight others they are seeing in [...]

  27. [...] are looking for a story, a brand promise that resonates with them and compels them to call one over the eight others they are seeing in [...]

  28. […] card easier to read) so I always recommend you use the back side of the card.  If you put your brand promise on the back, you can hand someone your card with that side facing up (and saying the brand promise […]

  29. […] card easier to read) so I always recommend you use the back side of the card.  If you put your brand promise on the back, you can hand someone your card with that side facing up (and saying the brand promise […]

Leave a Reply